Bushmeat hunting and trade in Myanmar's central teak forests: Threats to biodiversity and human livelihoods

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Bushmeat hunting and trade in Myanmar's central teak forests: Threats to biodiversity and human livelihoods

Tierra Smiley Evans, Theingi Win Myat, Pyaephyo Aung, Zaw Min Oo, Min Thein Maw, Aung Than Toe, Tin Htun Aung, Nang Sarm Hom, Khin Thawda Shein, Kyaw Zin Thant, Ye Tun Win, Wai Zin Thein, Kirsten Gilardi, Hlaing Myat Thu, Christine Kreuder Johnson

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Extensive forest degradation due to logging operations in the Bago Yoma region of Myanmar has led to “new hunting pressures on previously isolated wildlife populations and brings people into contact with potentially zoonotic pathogens.”  

Key Finding

  • By administering questionnaires, hosting focus groups, and collecting hunter data from five villages in the region, it was determined that the majority of hunted bushmeat was destined for local use (e.g. medicinal purposes) as opposed to being internationally traded to China or other areas within Myanmar 

Informing Action 

The ability to identify the key drivers of local hunting practices, as was done here, is essential to inform the development of successful wildlife conservation strategies and for implementation of educational campaigns on reducing disease transmission risk during practices such as hunting and bushmeat consumption.

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